History

In 1971, Nexus Recovery Center was originally established as High Hopes Rehabilitation Center on Tremont Street but later moved to Fairmount Street near downtown Dallas. In 1974, the program grew and started to include therapy and life skills training and we also had the capacity to house 17 women. In 1990, the facility relocated to an 11-acre campus on La Prada Drive in East Dallas to provide a wider array of services.
 
The new space enabled Nexus to become a leader in treatment for women by allowing children to accompany their mothers in treatment. In 1991, Nexus opened a program for adolescent girls and expanded the adult women program to 40 beds. We recognized that no treatment providers would accept pregnant or newly parenting teens, so Nexus began filling this service gap in 1993 and is one of the few providers to this vulnerable group in the great state of Texas.
 
To meet the needs of the children accompanying their mothers into treatment, the Crystal Charity Children’s Center was built in 1999 to house a nursery, pre-school classrooms, after school activity rooms, and a gross motor skills therapy room. In 2011, Nexus began providing onsite medical detox. In 2012, the Carolyn Jones Waghorne Youth Hall was opened, expanding the adolescent program to 30 beds. In 2017, Nexus began offering medication-assisted treatment to meet the demands of the opioid epidemic. In 2018 speech, occupational, and physical therapy became available to Nexus children with funds provided by the Crystal Charity Ball, and due to a request from the Department of State Health Services Nexus began providing medication-assisted treatment to pregnant women.
 
Nexus was selected as a community-based treatment setting for the Clinical Trials Network, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and was one of the settings for UT Southwestern Medical School’s grant-funded community-based drug trials. Continually striving for excellence, Nexus has been accredited by The Joint Commission since 2006, which is common for private centers, but rare in the nonprofit sector due to the high standards required to earn and maintain.